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cannot expire without a chance for notice and hearing. so that's due to state case law. so to the extent i think would you always have to have a hearing before officially revoking a permit. regardless of whether it's been extended. >> it's this period where they don't know if they have a permit or not. if you went by the rules and extended for 3 more years or whatever that period, you are still in the same predicament that someone who got a permit and didn't do anything. i think that should be stricken. >> we'll investigate it and talk to the city attorneys office and report back to you with what we can do. >> commissioner border? >> yes. i think this is an issue to get around the 3 year provision because we've seen a lot of cases. what we looked at in the hearing is the extension of the period. i don't know about the older projects because i think it's a little bit more complicated depending on the project and the number of times that people have come back for entitlement and extensions. we would review, we can pull things off the list to review their plans. i think if the issue is pra
which he fought for so long in the justice. the decision was law of the land. equal justice under law. >> when a supreme court decided the gideon case, they really brought light to that phrase. it doesn't matter if you are rich, it doesn't matter if you are poor, you get the same equal chance. >> just look at what happened to gideon. the supreme court didn't set gideon free but it gave him a fair trial with a competent attorney. >> not guilty. >> clarence earl gideon was a free man. the man who won a landmark supreme court case went to live a normal living with a job pumping gas. >> when i read where it says equal justice under law, i'm very inspired by that. i'm very comforted by that. but i know a lot of people are treated unfairly. i see it as something encouraging but i don't see it yet. >> it's written into constitution and established into the goal for society to reach for and live up to. people will fall short, rights can be ignored or even trampled. with nothing more than a pencil and knowledge. >> if you know your rights you can protect your rights. if you don't know your r
emerging to watch, she's also graduated from georgetown university law center and practicing attorney and abc television networks before starting her television career and next is john. i met john about 10 years ago when he was starting off and had this crazy idea of operating a training center for public defenders and he did. he's no now the president and founder and one of the contributors to gideon's army, he's from john marshall law school where he teaches law and criminal procedure. he was in the post katrina and new orleans center. he trained people in the film. he received an advocacy fellowship and named a public interest fellow by harvard law school. next we have maurice call well. he was convicted in the housing project here in san francisco. there was no physical evidence linking him to the crime yet he was still convicted based on the false testimony of a single neighbor. he was sentence to life behind bars. in prison mr. colwell contacted the center for help and located two witnesses who saw the murder and said mr. colwell was not involved in anyway. they located the re
. then because we have no money, we reach out to the local bar. law firms like jim's law firm or chris's law firm help us in situations where we are trying to establish counsel and reinforce. we get over a thousand cases a year. from that first request we are usually able to take it down to about half. many of them who are writing to us are not claiming to be innocent. they are probably claiming that their prison conditions are inadequate and they are probably right. they might be claiming that they haven't received their medication, they are probably right. they are probably -- they often complaining that they were overcharged and over sentence. they probably right. we refer them as much as we can to those that might be able to help them. from then we begin the triage process to see if there is any kind of assistance once we investigate and if we are able to litigate it. >> thank you. next i would like to ask jim, poor people who are accused of a crime have a right to a public defender but most of the cases are in civil court, child custody, workers right, compensation for catastrophic injuries
it will not be too late. myanmar's kevin is due to meet with journalists on saturday to discuss new media laws -- myanmar's government. some say the draft bill could undo the recent reforms. in myanmar is continuing to involve. mainly campaigners for freedom have been released from detention. an increasing number of journalists are on hand to report what they say, free of any prior censorship, but they are worried about proposals for new media laws. they say freedom of speech will be stifled just like it was by the previous military governments. tothis will bring us back square one. it is a made up law, which is intended to renew the 1962 media law. >> for those in the media industry, one of the most worrying aspects is a prison sentence of up to six months for publishers or journalists who break the rules and fail to pay fines. the loosely worded draft legislation would also ban materials that violate the military-backed constitution or right thing that could incite unrest. >> just as there are people for democracy in the forums, there are also people in the government i think who want to cli
walker struck it down saying it violated the equal protection under the law. in a split decision, a three-judge panel of the circuit court of appeals upheld that ruling last february. setting the stage before the u.s. supreme court. this past valentine's day, gay couples demanded marriage licenses at san francisco city hall as they have every year since 2004. they were turned away. >> it affects us in so many ways in our every day life. what we want is to be treated fairly. >> scott: i spoke with lieutenant governor gavin newsom recently about what compelled him to take a leading role in the gay marriage debate nine years ago. >> thanks for having me. >> scott: take us back to 2004. the marriage licenses began to be issued in san francisco. you had just gotten into office. what got into you? >> i went to the state of the union. nancy pelosi made a terrible mistake by giving me her husband's ticket to watch the state of the union. i was listening to the issues of the day. abstinence and drug testing. he would fulfill his private commitments now made public to ban same-sex marriage. it occu
cake and candles, the birthday bash for obama care t president's health care law turning 3 years old. and the left couldn't be happier. >> it's helped us honor our promise of life, liberty and pursuit of happiness. >> but as democrats party we're unwrapping more costs hidden in the health care law, a gift now standing 67 inches high, taller than the president when you pile on all of the new regulations. cashen in crashing the party right now. >> hello everybody. i'mric boling. wayne rogers, jonathan and tracy all joining us this week. welcome everybody. don't crack the bubbly yet. it's three years since president obama signed owe bbama care. boy, is it starting to get messy. that's not republicans declaring it messy. that's one of the architects of the law saying it. watch. >> i think we know it's going to be messy. there's going to be things that come up that are unanticipated. >> he's right. we bought this cake the woman the said you know what, obama care, that's why my hours got cut. i guess we can expect more of that. >> you are going to see a lot more of that. this is one exampl
. the supremes are hearing arguments on a new law that civil rights advocates. it is getting hot in the court and in the spin. it is a book that says take me with you. when did you know that grandma was the one? when her sister dumped me. grandpa was my dad a good athlete? no. oh dad, you remember my friend alex? yeah. the one that had the work done... good to see you. where do we go when we die? the ground. who's your girlfriend? his name is chad. and that's where babies come from. [ male announcer ] sometimes being too transparent can be a bad thing. this looks good! [ male announcer ] but not with the oscar mayer deli fresh clear pack. it's what you see is what you get food. it's oscar mayer. it's what you see is what you get food. guten tag. greetings earthlings. how you doin'? hola. sup. yello. howdy. what's crackalackin? it is great we express ourselves differently. if we were all the same, life would be boring. so get to know people who aren't like you. you'll appreciate what makes us different. the more you know. >>> the supreme court heard arguments today in a dispute over arizona's
's proposition eight. let's start with doma. it's the federal law that defines marriage as a union between and a man and a woman. it keeps gays from get iting th same rights. president clinton signed doma into law in 1996. he now says it should be struck down. avery freedman from cleveland, good to e see you. >> hi, fredricka. >> and richard herman, good to see you as well. avery, you first on this. two cases before the supreme court. let's begin with doma. how much is at stake here? >> i think this is one of the great cases that the the supreme court will hear this term. that and prop eight. but doma which was compromised legislation and signed by bill clinton back in 1996 has always been questionable in terms of constitutionality. and two federal appeals courts have held that that law that restricts personnel rights that is by the federal government violates the constitution. it violates the equal protection law. in terms of the significance of it, it's really march madness. this is so important and so exciting because you have the solicitor general arguing against the constitutionality
and liberal laws to voting rights. not to mention president obama already in a constitutional challenge to his choices to sit on the national labor relations board. they're taking its fight all the way to the supreme court after a d.c. appellate court invalidated the recess appointments made when the senate wasn't in recess. the senator has vowed to block the nomination. other stories we are bringing you tonight, wall street shrugging off a botched european union bailout of banks and an unprecedented tax on the deposits in cyprus, a tiny nation of 1.1 million people that will cost investors hundreds of billions of dollars in market capitalization. the dow jones industrial average down more than 100 points earlier but rebounded losing a modest 62 points. the s&p fell nine, the nasdaq down 11 and a half. the market off of the lows of the day. officials revising the imprudent and unreasonable plan to seize money from bank depositors to pay for the eu bailout. much damage has been done and some investors are so shaken, they will take their money out of the banks at their first opportunity, which i
it the law of the land you can't discriminate in the area of marriage. >> u.s. solicitor general will have a final 10 minutes or och sigs. he represents the president and will likely be asked about mr. obama's shift to support same-sex marriage. a key justice to watch will be justice anthony ken neddy. he has been a strong degrernd of gay rights and a champion of state ri.s he could be the swing vote. the court could dismiss the case for want of standing which would allow same-sex marriages in california. the court could rule prop 8 is unconstitutional, it could threaten similar bans in other states or could leave prop 8 in place ruling states have the right to decide for themselves. the 9th circuits decision states voters didn't have the right to take away the freedom california supreme court already granted. coming up at 6:00 state attorney general will weigh in along with one of the berkeley women who is one of the plaintiffs in this case. a quick correction. i said prop 8 vote was 2004. it was 2008. on california voters ban same-sex marriage in the state. reporting from the newsroom ab
. the president's healthcare reform law turns three tomorrow and for the first time, democrats join republicans to take a step back. tonight, chief national correspondent jim angling sets the staple for obamacare future looking at -- sets the stage for obam obamacare's futu. >> broad majority of the senate voted 79-20 last night to repeal part of obamacare. a tax on medical devices from hip replacements to mri machines. >> this is about innovation about jobs. >> other taxes are in place, including a $100 billion tax on insurance premiums. that will cause the average person $100 a year. part of the financing for what the president sees as his signature policy achievement. >> after a historic vote, healthcare reform is not an unmet promise. law of the land. >> some of those who know the business next are skeptical. >> a great misconception about the obamacare is just because you have health insurance you will get adequate healthcare. nothing could be further from the truth. >> obamacare will pay less to providers and increase number of insured by 30 million. >> patients don't get the services ren
it the affordable healthcare act or obama care turned three years old today. while some of the law has already taken effect the price tag hangs in the balance and it is huge by any measure, democrat or republican. with the stroke of a pen on march 23, 2010 after months of bitter debating in congress president obama made it the signature achievement of his first term. it faced numerous appeal attempts and seen a supreme court challenge. john boehner saying when democrats rammed obama care through congress three years ago they did so with a host of promises that are proving more empty by the day. instead of keeping the coverage they have an estimated 7 million americans are at risk of losing health insurance ." then the president marking the day by praising the law saying this in part "the affordable healthcare act will give hard working middle class families the healthcare security they deserve and protect every american from the worst insurance company abuses." all this as preparations continue for a full rollout of the law less than a year from how. molly henneberg live for us in washington. critic
? if you guys get over the racism, it is the law. get over it. the people who killed the people interact, it is the law. -- in iraq. host: what is the affordable care act have to do with racism ? caller: it has a lot to do with racism, taking her -- taking care of people -- we should cut the healthcare for the congress. see how they like it. we will move onto clay in biloxi, mississippi. caller: good morning. disabilityd and on after working 14 years, the five years of court reporting. we had a bombardment of advertisements for simple move -- healthcare for medicare. we find it replaces the medicare policy we currently have. after the deadline passed for the supplements, humana stopped advertising in mississippi. you can't get in touch with humana. the bureaucracy is just going to increase and as leaving the poor tople at a disadvantage correct and try to make reasonable choices for their healthcare. thank you for taking my call. host: a statement put out yesterday by the office of house democratic -- released following the statement today in recognition of the third anniversary of the a
, and the ability to get a job. not just because they are present in violation of the law but because they have a criminal record. this is a recipe for disaster that is irresponsible and unjustified. to make matters worse, many of these individuals lack the money, family, support and the ability to get a job, not just because they are present in violation of the law, but because they have a right -- a criminal record ultimately, the nonsensical action demonstrates the inability and a lack of desire on behalf of the administration to enforce the law, even against illegal immigrants convicted of serious crimes. we learned that 72% of the people released an okra record at all. another 21% had convictions for one or two misdemeanors only. unless to rector martin, who we welcome here today, tells us something different, this means that 93% of the people released by ice were not criminals or low, low level offenders. second, the title of the as for whether this was motivated by policy or politics, from my investigations, i don't believe it was either. i don't believe it was policy because we have no
campbell? that's good. those of you who don't, especially if you're in law enforce. you're probably going to want to write this down. no graph.net. randy campbell has been working in graffiti cases forever and he's a retired, i think, sheriff or highway patrolman. maybe somebody can help me out there. >> highway patrol. >> highway patrolman. what he runs it's no ground.net. for law enforcement, if you're looking for a tagger you think is crossing state boundaries and you catch one and you want to put up that person's tag to other law enforcement agencies, he's got a network where you can do that. so, you send that in to him, he sends it out and it goes to hundreds of cities. if you're looking for somebody and you think that other cities might know who that is, put that out and he'll send it out to all those cities. so, e-mail him and get on his network. he's got a website. and he's a great resource for law enforcement specifically and everybody else, too, but law enforcement specifically to help you find graffiti vandals or to add on to cases if you do find a graffiti vandal. so, this is
a scandal. in the next administration, angelico van buren is the hostess for her father-in-law, martin van buren, who is a wood door. -- widower. tonight, on c-span. >> last week the senate veterans affairs committee held a hearing on veterans mental health care and the need for assuring timely access to care. the hearing heard testimony from two panels, including mental health specialists and military veterans advocates. according to the veterans affairs committee chair, veterans are committing suicide at a rate of more than 8003 year and he urged the affairs department to increase the hiring rate for mental health clinicians. [gavel] of thethis hearing saturn -- senate veterans' affairs committee is beginning. i want to start by thanking our wonderful panelists for their years of experience in the important areas they are discussing with us today. i want to thank the va for being here as well. know, it isk we all 10 years with the united states went to war in iraq, went to war in afghanistan before that. what we have learned in a variety of ways is that the cost of those wars has been ve
a leading role in a decision to challenge voter id laws in texas and south carolina that could restrict minority voting rights. >>> several protesters and postal workers gathered in front of the national postal forum in san francisco today. many are upset about the postal service letting go of jobs and even closing post offices. ktvu's brian flores is outside one of the historic post offices slated to close with both sides of the controversy. good afternoon brian. >> reporter: good afternoon, tori. many postal workers say they are upset because their livelihoods are in danger, not only their jobs or pay may be reduced but historical post offices may close. meantime postal officials have attended the conference to generate new business despite paying millions of dollars to attend. >> but it must say important. >> speaking in front of hundreds of postal vendors, postmaster general patrick donahoe is looking toward technology to lead the postal service in the future. >> we think there is still plenty of growth opportunities because it's the most direct
operates the national and state criminal and background check system. we have to enforece the laws that we have. even the momentary glance at the laws we have proves there are holes in our system that even with adequate enforcement would not keep guns out of the hands that seek to do us harm. i'm focused on the fact that those on the terror watch list do not raise a flag in the system. what are those on the terror watch list and not automatically denied a fire arm from licensed firearms dealer and should it person?s listing on the list be a factor in the denial of a firearm? >> the reason those on the terrorist watch list [indiscernible] one of the factors is listed in the statute. there is legislation being discussed in terms of what more can be done to expand these prohibitive factors or to expand it and other ways the use of nix to bar the sale of guns. >> so a person can be on the terror watch list and yet we have to pass legislation to ensure that a person on that list can't purchase a gun. >> that is my understanding. >> the president has indicated he plans to devote additional resou
governor andrew cuomo wants to ease restriction option his just passed gun control law. the measure been as the sale of gun magazining holding less than seven bullets. he says it's unworkable since there is no seven rounds of magazine. so he wants a sale of clips holding up to ten rounds but forbid them from loading more than seven bullets in to them. meanwhile, also in new york, vice president biden today pledged to keep fighting for an assault weapons ban, even though fellow democrat harry reid is moving a bill forward without him. president obama's healthcare reform law turns three years old saturday. tonight, chief national correspondent jim angle tells us what we have seen so far. >> though obamacare opportunity fully take effect until january, parts of it are already in place, supporters, of course, point to the benefits. >> already more than 3 million young americans gain coverage through their parent's plan. preventive coverage free for tens of million of americans. >> children now have coverage. february they have a preexisting condition, children can stay on the parents' plan u
, a colorado sheriff explains why he won't enforce his' tough new you gun control law. and breakthrough artist of the year rock the house with the governor. ♪ >>> ladies and gentlemen, governor mike huckabee. [ applause ] >> mike: thank you. thank you very much. a great lively audience and a fantastic show lined up for you. welcome to huckabee from the fox news studios in new york city. who would have thought that just over four months after liberals were dancing in the streets over president obama's reelection they are now crying in their beer and some don't even drink beer but they started. because they are are now realizeing that their taxes have gone up. way up in some cases. and obama care which was supposed to save them $2,500 a year is busting their budgets as the cost of their healthcare is soaring. ultraliberal comedian bill maher must have met with his accountant and gotten his tax bill. here is what he said. >> rich people i'm sure you would agree with this actually do pay the freight in the country. something like 70%. and here in california i just want to say liberals you could
. they are important and enforceable law but we need them to do it in a way that is fair and we need to find out how to hold them accountable because a lot of their actions can and do produce in justices in the system. >> host: professor davis is the power institutionalized and tell all or just developed over the years? >> guest: the system of public prosecutions started right around the time of the democracy when we had this view that we wanted to vote for people and hold them accountable the people choose the individuals to perform these functions, and so when we start to get this prosecution because in the past there used to be practices, individuals, private individuals are able to bring charges against other individuals and they have to pay for it. that didn't last very long and then there was the prosecution system for the state and local system, so all of our states except for about four of them had elected officials for the state. federal prosecutors are appointed but state and local our elective officials and that ev process is supposed to be the way that we the people hold prosecutors acco
] >>> laws designed to combat voter fraud are popular with one particular demographic, the one that lost the white house in november. today, those forces are arguing before the supreme court that an arizona voter fraud law is so important its stringent documentation requirements so necessary that we should forget that federal law trumps state law. indeed. to understand, just how popular these laws are with conservatives, watch how the crowd at cpac responded to south carolina governor nikki haley when she mentioned her own state's voter fraud law. >> every election in our state now requires photo i.d. before you vote. >> joining us now is democratic congressman elijah cummings of maryland. welcome, sir. >> it's good to be with you. >> what is your response, sir, to hearing the crowds cheer like that for voter i.d. laws? because that line about voter fraud got a bigger response even than her line trashing the affordable care act. >> first of all, martin, i believe that voting is a right. and it's something that is afforded to all of our citizens and we should not be doing anything to prev
to hear those words. this is not to give the law- enforcement a short shrift. i have had an impact on my husband's life, some of the unwanted. but he has had an impact on mind. i have done extensive work with law enforcement, with the lapd and the los angeles county sheriff's. i am here to tell you that crime has been driven down in los angeles because of their efforts, but not only because of their efforts. so what does the collaboration look like. i want you to keep some ideas in mind. there is no first among equals. what we learned in los angeles was that oppression alone was not the answer. it did not work. there were record highs in gang violence in 2005. i want to tell you what has happened between 2005 and 2012. number one, the grass roots -- the disorganize, fragmented, passionate grass roots must be part of this. the community members who go to county supervisors meetings, the members who pass out fliers, the youths who have been in the juvenile justice system that are now part of the coalition -- those individuals must have a seat at the table. no. 2. community-based organizati
the state passes jessica's law. and bill, why are you afraid to confront new york governor andrew cuomo on jessica's law? >> a number of hard hitting reports on the governor. we now believe that like governor christie in new jersey he will sign jessica's law if it gets to his desk and we're working on that. not easy in new york. new jersey we did it and now we're coming here. william, liverpool, england. bill, this year i did not drink on st. patrick's day instead donated 50 pounds to charity. well, a tip of the hot to you, william. thanks for taking my tip of the day. bill from california i was disgusted by jesse watters showing teenagers inebriated at st. patrick's day. and arc gnaw, brit hume looked hot last night in his sweater. so let me get this straight, kay, you are saying that mr. hume looked hot, as in smoking? that's got to make his week. i don't think he ever heard that before. and finally tonight the factor tip of the day, had to read a lot of fiction because so much real stuff to digest, i have more homework than most kids. and it's a very exciting book, much better
your business dream a reality. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. [ male announcer ] book ahead and save up to 20 percent at doubletree.com, so you can sit back, relax and enjoy. doubletree by hilton. where the little things mean everything. accomplishing even little things can become major victories. i'm phil mickelson, pro golfer. when i was diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis, my rheumatologist prescribed enbrel for my pain and stiffness, and to help stop joint damage. [ male announcer ] enbrel may lower your ability to fight infections. serious, sometimes fatal events including infections, tuberculosis, lymphoma, other cancers, nervous system and blood disorders, and allergic reactions have occurred. before starting enbrel, your doctor should test you for tuberculosis and discuss whether you've been to a region where certain fungal infections are common. you should not start enbrel if you have an infection like the flu. tell your doctor if you're prone to infections, have cuts or sores, have had hepatitis b, have been treated for heart failure, or if you have symptoms s
. currently, it is against the law to purchase a gun if you are a criminal or have a dangerous record but not all require background checks. democrats are trying to put forward a bill that requires universal background checks. that has been the top priority for president obama. this bill will not include the assault weapons ban, which would ban certain types of high- capacity assault rifles and other weapons. there was not enough support in the senate to feel like that was possible to include and be able to pass the floor in the senate. it is a bit of a blow to the president agenda. host: here is the headline in the "washington post" -- how significant is it that the lead democrats and the senate is coming up with something and is going to move forward? it is significant that it is harry reid. prided himself on the support he received from the nra. he was able to use the support of gun rights groups to defeat in aepublican opponents difficult race. he has been reluctant to support gun control throughout the years. since the newtown shooting, he has been largely silent on the issue. it
and advocates are warningave major cultural shift if marriage equality becomes part of the law of the land. >> i wish it were just about the marriage altar. it is about much more. it's about altering all of society, with marriage goes what our children for taught, parents losing the right to define the morals for their children. it's about religious freedom. they are intertwined in our culture. it's about the right to conduct yours business as you see fit. >> support for same-sex marriage has groab, but it's favored by less than half, 49% of registered voters. one of the attorneys arguing for marriage equality this week says he thinks his side will win and it won't be close since he says, marriage is a civil right. >> we are not asking for a new constitutional right. the constitutional right to marry is well established. in fact, the supreme court has ruled you can't take away the right to marry, even from imprisoned felons who can't have procreation because they can't get together. but you can't take it away because it's so important, it's a fundamental right of liberty. >> there could be firew
that the job market out there. be the even more fearful than during the recession, which is the law. they're even less like a quit even though we should've expected a big increase in the recovery started. the more reason you can get that water level up even though you're adding a slaughter is because the number of jobs in terms of points is even lower than normal. one measure of how hard it is is to get the number of hires each month compared to the number of people unemployed and looking as well as the number of people who lived given up looking for work. you can see how the ratio has gone up and pretty much been stuck since 2009. we haven't really seen the number of jobs out there matching the number of people who are looking for work. and that gives you some idea of why this quit rate has not gone up, white state so though. people have said good idea of how hard it is to go and find a job. there's two groups of people being hurt the most. people at 55 and they basically lose their jobs there's a lot of trouble trying to find it and also very young people who are in train the job market
stricter gun control laws in a lot of places, in western states that are supposedly so libertarian and free-wheeling. i think it's going to be a long haul. i'm glad we have a billionaire on this issue. >> did you notice colorado what it did last week? a gun state, a hunting state. once reliably red. a transformational change. >> i think colorado is a good example. i grew up in that state, it definitely is a hunting-friendly state. i only lived in sweet states, strategic. >> there's some ohio blood in there? >> i'm going to move there for a while so i can say, i used to live in ohio, it's a swing state. you're seeing it in colorado where this is going. states are responsive on a local level. politics is all about pressure and leverage. for somebody like a mary landrieu, she doesn't see as a national poll as necessarily the pressure that's going to change her election. she's worried about louisiana. she's worried about getting re-elected in that state. and until you see the zeitgeist change within the state, these politicians are not responsive to that. where bloomberg can make a huge differe
vote. supporters say law would keep illegal immigrants from casting ballots. the critics claim the real goal here is to keep minorities away from the polls. today the justices heard arguments from both sides. and the new york city mayor michael bloomberg is not backing down after the judge struck down his ban on large sugary sodas. in fact, the mayor has already outlawed smoking in bars and restaurants and now he he is going after tobacco again. how this time? you'll see for a while. my wife takes centrum silver. i've been on the fence about it. then i read an article about a study that looked at the long term health benefits of taking multivitamins. they used centrum silver for the study... so i guess my wife was right. [ male announcer ] centrum. always your most complete. i really like your new jetta! and you want to buy one like mine because it's so safe, right? yeah... yeah... i know what you've heard -- iihs top safety pick for $159 a month -- but, i wish it was more dangerous, like a monster truck or dune buggy! you can't have the same car as me! [ male announcer ] now everyone's
and though many key parts of the health care law don't go into effect until next year, many americans are already feeling the impact of the changes to the nation's health care system. let's check in now with a checkup on obama care. >> reporter: dueling opinions in washington today on the impact of obama care and whether it's been a boon or a boondoggle to americans and american businesses. obama says it protects americans from insurance companies and says the slaw saving people money. the president said in a statement, millions of americans are saving $600 a year on prescription drugs. millions of young people have beenable to stay on their family's health plan to age 26. preventive care, like mammograms for women and wellness visits for seen, i don't covered free of charge. most importantly, for the sake of our fiscal future, the growth of health care costs is beginning to slow. but the democratic-controlled senate voted early this week to repeal part of obama care, passed with bipartisan support. they repealed a tax on medical devices that would have increased the costs we all pay
the law. they approved a bill for everyone last month. it's up for a vote in the senate in april. right now people are lining up outside the supreme court trying to get front row seats to history. the court tackles same-sex marriage in less than two days. justices will hear arguments for the first case on tuesday involving california's proposition 8, the ban on same-sex marriage. the second strs on the defense of marriage act which defines marriage as between a man and a woman. cnn.com has been covering this very extensively. john, you recently followed some gay couples. i looked at some videos you had this morning, trying to get married in mississippi, a state that bans same-sex marriage. here's a clip of that. >> this application is a record, and it is a permanent record. but we're showing it's denied. >> i can't imagine what it might be like to be in your position, to have to tell people who clearly have a home together, share things and love each other -- >> i appreciate you all -- >> that's part of a story on cnn.com by john sutter. also with us is ryan anderson of the heritage fou
is a highly regarded securities lawyer, a professor at the university of san diego law school, and an expert on sarbanes-oxley. >> the idea was to have a criminal statute in place that would make ceos and cfos think twice, think three times, before they signed their names attesting to the accuracy of financial statements or the viability of internal controls. >> and this law has not been used at all in the financial crisis? >> it hasn't been used to go after wall street. it hasn't been used for these kinds of cases at all. >> why not? >> i don't know. i don't have a good answer to that question. i hope that it will be used. i think there clearly are instances where ceos and cfos signed financial statements that said there were adequate controls, and there weren't adequate controls. but i can't explain why it hasn't been used yet. >> we told partnoy about eileen foster's allegations of widespread mortgage fraud at countrywide and efforts to prevent the information from reaching her, the federal government, and the board of directors--in violation of the company's internal controls. i mean, th
. that is under current law, the law the president supports. he changed to make that, so it is financially feasible. our program would move us in the direction of premium support, which is what members of congress have. it will allow for a certain amount of money subsidy, a benefit check, if you will, for seniors to be able to utilize that to purchase what they want for themselves so they are able to have an insurance program that is much more responsive to them. as a physician, medicare patients are having a whale of a time finding doctors to take medicare. if you are a new medicare patients and your doctor prior to the agencies the five does not take medicare patients, you have a very difficult time finding a new dr. who will take a new medicare patient. one out of every three doctors in this country have limited the number of patients they are seeing. see no of every eight medicare patients at all. the program is flawed and needs to be reformed. we need to strengthen medicare. our guest,rice is republican of georgia. we are talking about budgetary matters. the numbers are on the screen.
challenges for law enforcement as they have no profile and their experiences and motives are also -- are often distinct. for a moment, i would like to discuss the cyber threat, which has evolved over the past decade. cyber criminals have become increasingly adept at exploiting weaknesses in our networks, and once inside, they can infiltrate government and military information, as well as our valuable and -- intellectual property. organized criminal act cyber send the kids and in deal -- ideologically driven activist groups. willieve the cyber threat be cool or eclipse the terrorist threat in the future. we are enhancing our capabilities. we have focused our cyber division on addressing computer intrusions and network attacks. each of our offices have become cyber task forces. we're cloud there -- collaborating and sharing with our federal partners more than ever in the context of a national cyber joint task force, which has 19 military, law- enforcement agencies working together to stop current attacks and prevent them in the future. we also recognize that the private sector is th
where this evidence is the most useful. we have a standard in criminal law called the reasonable person standard. this fictitious person that we measure everybody's conduct by. we say this is the person, the average person, the average juror, the average individual, the kind of conduct that we would expect an average member of society to live up to. well, as it turns out that none of us are quite average, right. and we might actually be much more like people who we share particular brain structures with or people who we share particular environmental and brain similarities to. so we might need to start thinking about more particularized notions of conduct based on what we would expect of a person who has that type of brain structure who had these types of environmental factors and then start to think about how we want to treat them. do we want to hold those people responsible for their actions or less responsible for their actions. are there certain people who would be better subject to medical treatment instead of incarceration. are there certainly people who we actually think would be
and law enforcement can work together on measures that will ensure that certain operators are being a bit more responsible because that creates an issue for everyone else and i think that is where i hope that we go. >> anything else? and by the way, i think who knew that three harvard law grads would be so interested in this issue. i think that is president chiu noted that. >> is there any, anything else that chief? >> no, i think that complete agreement here. we all want to see the city prosper, and the clubs do well, and do the safely and responsibly. >> i think that we are working towards that goal and working closely with the entertainment in doing it. >> why don't we open it up to public comment. any member who would like to speak, please come forward. >> hello, i am stephanie grain berg and i am here representing the cpab as well as the neighbors which is a neighborhood association (inaudible) ininclusive of the troubled long troubled broad way corridor. first of all, thank you for having this hearing, i think that it is very, very important. i am here really to request or plead, if
choosing boe tech, an east coast consulting firm to help implement the new law legal rising marijuana for the purpose of getting stoned. >> we look forward to working with the board to address the unprecedented challenge of organizing a taxed and regulated market in way that is plekt public health and public safety. >> why did boe tech win? >> they were the highest individual scores in each of the four categories. >> some have called the position the state's drug czar. >> i don't believe that's our official title. >> the competition for the contract was fierce. >> we ended up getting a ton of responses, actually 112 submissions received by the agency, and 95 of those were actual proposals. out of that we had 43 proposals deemed non-responsive. >> wonder why. the pot head consultant bo tech's ceo mark kleinman is already controversial among activists because he expressed concern about state legalization efforts conflicting with federal law. >> we have no idea what the federal government is going to do. if they step in with an injunction, we won't implement based on the dates in 502, bu
husband john quincy adams and the complex relationship with her mother-in-law, abigail adams. we will include your questions and comments by facebook and twitter tonight. >> the republican party released a plan this morning for its approach to the next presidential election that deals with attracting minority and women voters. announced this. these comments are just under one hour. >> i appreciate that introduction. thank you for the introduction of in welcoming us to the press club. i know most of you came for eggs and coffee but thank you for staying for the speech. i want to recognize our co- chair sharon day and are treasurer tony day. day. our treasurer tony all, i you and most of want to think and how grateful i am to this opportunity project. their work cut brings us here today. i want to introduce them this morning. henry barbara of mississippi, glenn mccall of south carolina, former whitew, and house press secretary ari fleischer. when republicans lost in november, it was a wake-up call. in response, i initiated the most public and most, free handson if post election rev
member should do. of course, we have regulations to vote, to discuss laws and permits. we have a budget to control and in that budget, you will see our mobility policy. you can have your own expenses on infrastructure work, for instance, but in brussels, we also have an important policy on financing groups, social groups who are working on the issue. and i believe we should never forget to work on equity because we have those big social differences within our town. this is just shortly a slide that shows you what already has been polled, that denmark and the netherlands, they are in fact far ahead of all of the other european countries and belgium is somewhere in-between making an effort but for sure also at this trip, i have been able to learn a lot from my european colleagues in denmark and in the netherlands. brussels is in the heart of europe and i think it's also has been a very good thing that there is european regulations, although at this moment, european regulations are mainly on achieving certain environmental standards. let's say pollution by co2 and particles. but that has h
with those individuals. we abide by the open records laws, and the sunshine laws and i think in san francisco we haven't talked to the city attorney about that or your counsel about that but the open records laws and sean -- sunshine laws protect them up to appointment so we're not in a situation where every transmission of information is available to the general public. if that is the case or that becomes the case then we change the strategy around a little bit so we can help to protect the identity of the candidates, not necessarily the backgrounds, but the identity of the candidates by still abiding by those laws. >>i think one of the strengths of your team is the tremendous community involvement and searches that you done. i find it interesting to the work you did in l.a. and many nonprofits. my hope is as our diverse communities expect topnotch transportation selection processes like this that we can involve them in as many of the aspects of the profile and the competencies that we can and i welcome a number of stakeholder groups and give you the recommendations as we sit do
, it was a law professor and a community organizer. and i think he was probably a liberal from the jump. and ted cruise comes out of a different political atmosphere. texas is very different from chicago he has the experience and the background of a guy who made it from scratch in the state of texas, which is -- you know low tax opportunity state. and you see the effect it's had on these two men, not that they wouldn't have those convictions anyway you can see it. >> bill: the nation is going to have to decide i think in the next four years what kind of country they want. because this is not going to be able to compromised. it's too big. brit hume, everybody, living large down there in miami. if you need any help, brit, call us tonight and we will help you out. directly ahead, a grizzly murder in colorado. will the woman beat the rap? there she is. big beef tonight. those reports after these messages. what's droid-smart ? with google now, it automatically knows when you need to leave for the airport, how much traffic there is, and can have your boarding pass ready. the droid razr maxx hd by moto
through the ordinance language. not once does it mention pass through. these are laws which are currently on the books and we believe the process works in our significant meetings we've had with tenant communities and with the ram port, we know there are hardship applications available for disabled and senior citizens and people who can not afford a resident increase in this nature. i know they are one of five organizations that receive funding from san francisco to help people with this process. with a we would like to do and i would like to give credit to supervisors breed for the amendment in the ordinance that there is now amendment for community outreach. this is a broad base piece of legislation which is in a 30 year plan, but to put it in this ordinance is something we need to do with significant outreach to the community, to the existing city departments that are going to be plan checking this, but to really make sure that if someone can't afford to pay for this, there are avenues that someone can take and i'm happy to have you come up to discuss the detail hardship of this proces
. >> and at least in spring through june. >> so we will actually have to adopt the change of the bi laws and we can call the meetings every month. >> i would rather keep it special meetings for may, april and, may, i think that once we get through, this, through the budget, i think that meeting at 9:30 will be appropriate. >> i don't want to go through changing the by laws. >> okay. >> that would be my preference >> thank you so much. the staff, and thank you so much to board members and if there are no further announcements are discussions the meeting is adjourned. >> -- to track stolen phones to be used in the field for other investigative purposes. that is approximately 977 dollars. >> you have a memo from the captain in your packets regarding this do nation. ironically to track cell phone thefts. is there anything you'd like to add? commissioners, questions or concerns? and is there any public comment regarding this matter. >> [inaudible] for quite a few times starting when he was the secretary for the police commission. i have a great deal of respect for him. i believe his promotion was w
, medicine, or any ethical code that i know of or the bible, for that matter for our criminal law tdistinguishing between those wo have alcohol and tobacco and people who put other substances in their body. there is no legitimate basis for distinguishing between the alcoholic on the one hand under criminal law and between the drug addict on the other. that is first. the second ethical point is i hope most of you agree with this. i do not believe that anybody should be punished simply for what we put into our own bodies absent harm to others. nobody deserves to be punished for what we put in our bodies absent harm to others. hurt somebody, yes and not tell me your addiction was the excuse. we need to be regarded as sovereign over our minds and bodies. the criminal law should not be treating anyone as a criminal for what we put in here. when one is trying to pursue a particular public health or public safety objective, reducing the harm of drugs or whatever it might be. and when you have powerful evidence that a non-course of system can accomplish that public safety health objective
counsels that i talked about in liberated areas, to develop their police forces because law and order as you heard in turkey, is a big issue. and so we need working with partners, i think the germans are going to help us with this. >> excuse me, ambassador, i only have a minute left. could you just answer my question? >> on the question about assad, there's two possibilities. we see him pulling forces in. will he hold out in damascus at the end? maybe. but a lot of observers think he might instead retreat to the heartland of the base of his support which would be up along the coast in northwest syria. we're not quite sure which he would do. >> let me reclaim my time. i'm sorry, mr. ambassador. the opposition, when mr. weber was asking you questions. the leading opposition movement, is that an al qaeda affiliate? that an al qaeda affiliate? >> no, absolutely is not. the al qaeda affiliate is a small part of the opposition. it is a small minority. the voice is getting louder. >> is this hassan hito the new prime minister, what is his affiliation with the muslim brotherhood? we heard rep
in the bail reform act of 1984, the federal law, the birth of preventative detention which one thought was clearly unconstitutional and then became a public good that changed the whole view of a system. now we live in a justice preemptive justice, but they will commit other crimes in the future. i would say if we all now agree or at least many of us agree with justice kennedy that the result has been a prison system that is barbaric that doesn't belong in a civilized society and serious atonement and i think you would recognize in the california prisons to meet that. let me say why it's a risk. it's always so reasonable to see risk as a way on out of these. i don't think i need to remind those in the room that an entire population were incarcerated for risk. nobody was held accountable for it either. if you look at the way this is a risk, you see racial class is at the end of the day the right kind of community ties and is risk reduction. professor simon, let me ask a follow-up. i want to get an idea of what a system you are advocating would look like. let's say you have arraignment f
the top union protests. in michigan, they're mad about a right to work law that starts next week. and in washington, they're mad about all of the automatic spending cuts they say will get worse every week. but with right to work states adding more jobs and with many in the government looking to cut more spending, is it time tore unions to simply get with the program? charles payne, dagen mcdowell, adam lashinsky, charlie gas pregas-- gasperino. >> and with the. >> i love the big raps. >> and communities with fewer presence of unions are doing better communities and businesses. the they drove hostess out of business and they have to figure out the dynamics. they've got to take a step back, we're trying to benefit and not in it for ourselves and the message doesn't get across anymore. >> neil: dagen? >> this is evidence of unions on the run. if you look at michigan, a huge move that that state, kind of the birth of unions as we know it in this country, is now a right to work state, but what you see -- you're starting to see the down and dirty tactics. a lot of unions in that state
outcomes then it's the policy. >> paul: and perez was housing housing law to prosecute banks with this theory. >> that's right. >> paul: and he thought this might be illegal, why? because the disparate is used in some parts, but not in housing. >> it's employment. but they don't have the same language as title vii law and he was afraid at that st. paul would win this case. by the way, st. paul itself said it thought it would win, but dropping the case because it it didn't want to endanger important anti-discrimination work that the justice department was doing. so think about that, you have a senior member of the justice department leaning on other parts of government to withdraw a case, deny the supreme court the ability to rule on this disparate practice under the fair housing act and in the meantime, having the government in the join two cases that could have brought tens of millions of dollars to taxpayers. >> paul: can you believe any case like this, jason, where the official basically got somebody to drop a case the supreme court had already accepted? >> no, no, i can't
movement. a year later, a couple in minnesota was denied a marriage license because state law limited marriage to persons of the opposite sex. their case made to the u.s. supreme court back in 1972. it was dismissed without so much as a written opinion. the court ruled that same sex couples have no constitutional rights married and that the legal challenge itself failed to raise a substantial federal question at all. but the struggle continued. it would be another 14 years before the supreme court would issue a major ruling on civil rights for gay americans in bour versus hard wig. in the summer of 1982, michael baurs was arrested and charged by atlanta police by committing a private act with another adult man in his own bedroom. his case made it to the high court in 1986 where georgia's law criminalizing adult gay male couples for engaging in private consensual sexual acts was upheld. it was not until 203 that that decision was overruled when the court recognized the constitutional right to privacy for lesbian and gay individuals. the struggle still continues. ten years after bowers,
. with today's announcement, this stop is now protected by law. so generations of americans can remember those struggles and those sacrifices. we need to remember the past so we can address the problems of the president. a program is put in place to help the legacy of slavery. this comes week after the law designated to protect minority rights in some places with an ugly history. today we also learned that a democratic governor in arkansas had to veto republican voter i.d. bill to become a state law. these are serious cases and serious issues. issues born from our past. the great southern writer willi william faulkner wrote he, the past is not dead. it's not even past. we must not forget the struggles that continue today. and we must muster courage, imagine the courage it took for tubman to keep going back in the south, possibly being captured or killed. we don't need that much courage, just some of that courage. we'll face the deals that are trying to be cut to turn the clock back on progress in america. we all need to have a little tubman in us. thanks for watching. i'm al sharpton. "hardbal
bash for obamacare. law turning three years old today. left couldn't be happier. >> it helps us of honor of life, liberty and pursuit of happiness >> eric: a gift now standing 6'7" taller than the president. cashin' in, crashing the party right now. >> eric: i'm eric boling and "cashin' in" crew is with us this. we and welcome everybody. don't crack the bubbly just yet. it's been three years since president obama signed obamacare into law. regulations keep growing and growing. is it starting to get messy. republicans declaring messy that is one of architects saying it himself. >> i think we know it is going to be messy. there will be things that come up that are unanticipated. >> eric: he is right. when we bought the cake. woman said obamacare that is why my hours got cut. i guess we can expect more of that? >> you are going to see a lot more of that. this is direct impact that it is having. we had the legislation and people are trying to read it and get through it. now you see the regulations piling up a and practical day to day coming out in the form of a woman who is trying t
people witnessed the crime and did not step in. ohio has a law that if you witness a crime you must report it. there are many more that need to be charged for this. >> michael: lou shapiro when you hear that, ohio does have this law. it's a felony not to report a crime. it's seldom invoked. i went to school with an honor system. if you saw someone cheat you're as culpable as the cheater. >> the general public is not always expected to know what is a crime and what is not a crime. when someone is faced with a question, did you see the person may say, i didn't see it that way or it didn't hit me that way that's why it's not typically invoked. >> michael: as a defense attorney now. let's say--i'm going to give a hypothetical. these two kids were convicted. you're representing one of the people who are under surveillance by these grand juries under possible indictment. what do you say to the grand jury? what do you have your clients say here? at this point this case has been adjudicated. >> i would advise my client to play it as close to the vest as possible. if he hold out long enough
politics and fun but as the president, his job, the law requires him, to submit a budget by the first monday in february. four of the first five years of his presidency he's failed and this is the first time since the law went into effect congress was forced to kick off the budget process because the white house -- >> the president's people would say it's -- they're hammering over the budget, sequestration. that's what prompted this. it's not all his fault. >> first of all he missed three of the previous four. >> neil: other presidents have missed. >> but his number of misses. >> neil: higher than theirs? >> if we're talking about shooting percentage, he's hitting 1-5. >> neil: what's in it for him being late? >> he sees what's in it for me or what do i suffer by not doing it on lets let the house do their plan. the senate will put out their plan which never balances. i'll say nice things and eventually put out my plan which isn't going to go anywhere but you can't ignore the law. if you're a conservative and sports fan you shouldn't be man that the president is having fun doing his b
of what happened nobody has any idea what motivated this murder. law enforcement said they're not jumping to conclusions whether his job or his job as second in command of state prisons in missouri before he came to colorado, whether any of those job titles had anything to do with his murder last night. they said they're keeping an open mind as to the possibility that what he does for a living had nothing to do with why he was killed. but in response to the killing, at what is already a heightened time of political tension in the state, colorado officials have responded by increasing security for other top government officials in the state. they have also increased security at the governor's mansion. this is happening in colorado at an already heightened time. the colorado legislature has been debating and passing gun reform legislation and that debate has been unusually contentious. they have pledged on the floor of the senate that they will disobey them. they will disobey the state's new laws. democratic lawmakers have received threats for their support of gun reform. criminal charges h
. eight shotgun shells expand background checks the background check fee, and the laws will go into affect on july 1st. it happened in the state of colorado where today they woke up the department of corrections was asass fated. he's friend of governor john hickenlooper. john hickenlooper said he signed this ban on high capacity weapons because it's a sticking point on the gun control debate. >> i think this ban on high capacity magazines is of that same ilk. it allows us to con tim contemplate someone who is bent on destruction just the seconds that it allows others to escape. >> michael: coloradoans were able to do what the united states senate was unable to do. dianne feinstein's ban did not pass on the floor vote because harry reid decided they were not going it to put it in their gun bill that they're going to put on the floor. it's an assaults weapons ban. over 200 weapons are still available to americans. but no, this was not good enough. the reason was because reid and other democratic senators were afraid of how it would play. max baucus of montana jon tester of montana. mark begi
the governor of colorado signed an important gun safety bill into law, a series of bills into law. the new laws limit ammunition magazines and requires universal background checks to be paid for by gun customers themselves. they followed new york who just over a month ago became the state with the toughest gun laws in the country. outlawing magazines with more than seven rounds and gun safety is a national problem but the states are leading the way. none more than the state of new york. joining me now is the man who played the pivotal role in getting those laws passed, new york state attorney general eric schneiderman. mr. attorney general, welcome back to the show. you had a top law enforcement official in one of the biggest states in the country. tell us how you managed to get things done what congress so far has not been able to do. >> i think we ought to give credit to my colleagues in government and really on a bipartisan basis in new york, i think people seized the political moment. it was a galvanizing force and the bill that the governor and senate and assembly passed and i'm now defend
was on the wrong side of the law, had four sealed arrests that sort of thing. and without anybody knowing the particulars of it, and then the sequence of vents that they used that you recited took place. while it might an tragedy he's not somebody who deserves a lot of sympathy, he's not someone who deserves a movement springing up around him. this is really kind of what the core dispute is about. as far as the facts of this case and then it spins out into a larger subject of police tactics and police community relations. >> john: ryan what is east flatbush like. my father comes from the neighborhood. but people may not have an idea of the community. what is this community like for people who have no idea what the community is like. >> it was a community that was deeply saddened by the death of a teenage boy kimani gray by every account that i heard. he was well-known in the neighborhood. he liked to play basketball. he was a funny kid. you know, people are genuinely upset about what they saw or what happened, and there's a lot of mistrust about the police department's narrative in this s
in a state, a state that has the most restrictive laws in the country? during the election, president obama promised change we can believe in and he's delivering. republicans promise change, too. but nobody believes in it, least of all the republicans. joining me now are krystal ball and joan walsh. thanks for being here tonight. >> thanks for having us, reverend. >> do the republicans not notice their rhetoric, that it doesn't mesh with their reality? >> i don't know, to be honest with you. because on the one hand, they see the demographic trends. the rnc conducted an autopsy of their dead party. we know that there's a problem. >> we call it a flawtopsy. >> on the other hand, it would really upset their base on gay marriage, even as 58% of americans accept gay marriage, the base of the republican party is in this very different place. so they don't know how to make that movement without upsetting their base, which is why you saw after that autopsy, which did make some comments about young people needing to see that the republican party was more open on issues of equality for the lgbt commu
crowds with tear gas and riot greer. protesters are against the proposed law allowing same-sex couples to marry. french lawmakers approved the bill for everyone last month. it's up for a vote in the senate come april. >>> a week from easters and tenses of thousands gather to hear the new pope lead palm sunday prayers. ♪ the pope broke with tradition at the start of the ceremony, greeting the crowd in an open jeep instead of a bulletproof pope mobile. during his message pope francis urged followers to shun corruption and greed. >>> have you noticed that your gas is cheaper? we're on a four-week streak where gas prices are on a steady decline. the lundberg survey reports the national average is 3.71 for a gallon of regular unleaded. that's 22 cents cheaper than a year ago this week. the most expensive gas is in chicago. cheapest is in billings, montana. >>> a pre-historic's family's road trip rose to the top of the box office this weekend. >> my name is eep and this is my family, the croods. he's been in a cave forever. >> three days is not forever. >> it earned more than $44 million.
, medical device century tax, on the healthcare law, so it's not as if we're immune. the bank thing is being waged in cyprus but it's not unprecedented. >> it's happened here before, neil. i you go back to the bank holiday act of 1933, they confiscated all the gold and sell very from private holders and then devalued the dollar. they just stole it. can that can happen here. >> neil: what would trigger something like that? >> you know, what happens there is a financial collapse elm if we keep running trillion dollar deficits, no growth, which is true, and we keep having these states with higher taxes and destroying output, it could happen here. it terrifies me. >> what would trigger it would be sharply higher interest rates when people -- in order to buy our debt. not talking about just a few points here but dramatically higher interest rates where it's impossible for us to pay our entire debt load. then becomes a point where we reach financial collapse. >> neil: when people don't trust their financial institution. but when it's your bank bank, your passbook savings account, that is called in
the governor signed new gun-control laws it was a tragic prelude to what was supposed to be a triumphant day for gun limits. the governor signed the bill and afterward said even if washington continues to ignore the please of the people, his state won't. >> i wanted to make sure that -- that again people out there recognize that we were listening, that we do take this very seriously, and we're not trying to create loopholes that could inconvenience or put at risk, law-abiding citizens. >> michael: getting sensible gun safety laws passed simply should not be this hard but today john hickenlooper showed washington how it is done. and then to the very red state of south carolina. mark sanford has gone from the appalachian trail back to the campaign trail, and yesterday he made the transition look pretty easy. he beat a field of 16 candidates, but will have to stand in a runoff race, and things are getting whacky on the democrat side as well. they have elizabeth colbert-busch. this one has a reality show written all over it. joining me now for the robert behre. he's a politi
mean, because of this difficulty of getting these federal laws, some states have already started passing their own. colorado's governor signed the law there yesterday. we saw the very sweeping law in new york, although already they've had to back off a little bit on magazines because the problem is they didn't actually manufacture the kind of magazines they were talking about. having said that, rana, could this be where this debate is shifting? joe biden's somewhat optimistic belief notwithstanding. >> i think so. i think new york is going to get attention no matter what because of mayor bloomberg being involved in this issue. again, i hope he continues strongly down this path because i think he has the power to sort of look across both sides of the aisle and really bring some unity here. i think it's interesting that some of these western states are actually moving ahead and passing laws. i think that goes to the point that we have this idea that, you know, particularly in the west and in the south that gun control has always been a big libertarian issue, that we have this very
. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. >> the >> a prank staged for youtube is getting attention today because the prankster got thrown in jail. watch in. a teenager doing a flip over the heads of two police officers on a park bench. the cops apparently didn't think it was funny once they discovered that he filmed it. >> i just filmed that? put your hands behind your back. >> megyn: oh, really? the 18-year-old was handcuffed and spent the night in jail and the video nearly 3 million hits on youtube. sometimes you have no idea how a simple small act of kindness can lead to bigger things. and this may be one of those times. it all began when a generous stranger and military vet reached out to this woman, the girlfriend of an american soldier now serving our country in afghanistan. listen to the story. trace gallagher has got it, trace. >> reporter: don't cry, megyn. >> megyn: you know me well. >> reporter: yeah, the soldier's name is albert d simone, stationed at fort stuart georgia and deployed to afghanistan. his girlfriend and her two kids live outside of boston and has a bumper sti
lawmakers to enact new gun laws? facebook.com/carolcnn or tweet me @carolcnn. >>> in missouri, charges expected to be filed today against a man who interrupted kansas city mayor sly james during a speech on tuesday. >> million dollars in investment -- >> this man has just got through talking about exactly [ bleep ] [ bleep ] [ bleep ]. >> that's not okay. affiliate kctv reports the mayor's body guards wrestled the man backstage. mayor james, a former marine, he was not hurt. he called the incident unfortunate. >>> to michigan now where police got quite a shock during a patrol stop. it happened yesterday in c kalama kalamazoo. officers stopped to talk to a man sitting in a parked car. he said he just hit a deer and then picked it up to take it home for food. but when he popped the trunk, the deer hopped out. i guess they'll be calling for takeout now. >> now is your chance to talk back on one of the big stories of the day. the question for you this morning, will the newtown death photos force lawmakers to enact new gun laws? gun control democrats are a frustrated bunch. despite polls sh
justice. it was not appropriate any more to become a nun and i decided to study law as a. so i went to college were my brothers were studying they followed our parents they were both doctors and my two younger brothers also were coming to college at the same time so there were five of us together. we were very lucky to get an apartment a house where oscar wilde was born and the coach would tell all the passengers to turn their heads but for reasons i go into not so much to do with me but in that same era of law school and someone i became friendly with called nicholas robinson says three of us got honors we were among those three and we went out to dinner and he decided he had better things to do so he would sit at the back of the class you draw cartoons but i sit at the front hoping to achieve good grades. i also signed forced myself and i try to save is honestly i wrote the memo are to be encouraging, push yourself and reach potential so i pushed myself to stand up and i got better at it so i decided to go forward for the dublin university law society and the first female student
gun law reforms. mayor bloomberg told nbc's david gregory on "meet the press" that lawmakers are going to spern the public at their peril. >> if 90% of the public want something and their representatives vote against that, common sense says they are going to have a price to pay for that. >> later in the same program, mr. common sense, himself, the nra's wayne lapierre dismissed the mayor's campaign as a mere vanity project. >> he can't spend enough of his $27 billion to try to impose his will on the american public. they don't want him in their restaurants, they don't want him in their homes, don't want him telling them what food to eat. they shiure don't want him tellg them what defense firearms to own. he can't buy america. >> right. of course, the nra never tries to use its financial resources to influence opinions. wayne lapierre seems to forget mayor bloomberg doesn't need to buy public opinion on this issue because the majority of americans agree with him. between 85% and 91% of americans support universal background checks in recent polls. that includes 85% of gun owners. so mor
dollar it seems that we spend, leave the president's health care law in place, put new regulations on main street. and this is what will get -- what we'll get more of. family will continue to fall further and further behind. families who are looking for a job, who either drop out completely an give up working, or they're forced onto food stamps. families that watched wall street grow wealthier as they gain, what, $10 a month in their paycheck? the republican budget changes the course of not just our financial position of the country, it changes the course of our economy. adding immediately 1% growth, closing that growth gap here in this first year. arding more income, $1,500 to a family. over the next 10 years, doing dramatically more, both for families to come. that's what the republican budget is about, about chaining the growth gap, closing it, giving our families a fighting chance again. i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman reserves. the gentlelady from new york. ms. ma low mi: i grant seven minutes to a new member of the joint economic committee, john del
put up. again, we know that these budgets respect going to become law. so, why the exercise? what's the point? >> definitely this broke all records for a vote a rama, what we call these extensive 13-hour-long debates, more than 100 amendments that were considered. but it's -- working the will of the senate, frankly. and it also, one of the things that's key we focus on is some of the amendments that did or didn't pass because they are going to be used in some of these elections in 2014 in terms of the keystone pipeline, for example. that amendment did pass. >> bill, anna brings up a significant point, a lot of folks who have been talking about this idea that the lion's share of what we saw unfold last night over on c-span, a lot of that was designed for campaign ads a lot was just for campaign commercials what does that say about the budget process? >> it is actually moving forward because the democrats have finally said they do support raising tax, only on the wealthy americans but esensely, what's changed, they didn't pass a budget for four years, any budget threat they passed w
out the country by essentially raiding people's bank accounts. law mickers are set to vote on the plan tomorrow. if passed the government would seize up to 10% of some people's hard-earned savings in order to pay off the mistakes. the plan causing outrage. word of atms running out of cash. people trying to take money out of the bank. now fear of a bank run has the government shutting down all bank until at least thursday or friday. now concerns that other struggling countries could try the same thing and that sent chills through the markets around the world. right now the dow has recovered from the session lows. it was briefly up, and ever so briefly. but now we're down just a little bit. jerry willis is here. this cyprus situation is more than just raiding people's bank accounts. this has to do with people who, it's believed, may have been laundering money through the banks. >> that's right. but it would affect everybody, whether you laundered money or not you might wake up and the government would have its fat hand in your bank account, which i can't imagine anybody thinks positively
that put together the healthcare law and stood by politicians when they said stupid stuff like this. >> we have to pass the bill, so that you can find out what is in it. >> neil: well, never mind the lawyers actually knew what was in it. they wrote it. they just didn't feel telling us all the stuff that was in it. push coverage for preexisting conditions or keeping older kids on your policy. gloss over the bad stuff like thousands of part-time workers probably, well, losing the policies, collateral damage. i.e.d. now, top obama architect of that law admitting the obvious, the healthcare law is messy. you think? nothing he neglected to point out a few years ago when the warning could have come in handy. too late. we're knee-deep now and it's costing us through the nose. premiums going up much more than they said. doctors dropping out of their professions, much more than they feared. fine mess, i'm sure, in the fine print. where i'm equally sure there was a blanket policy for policy that would provide no blanket no, warmth, no protection, guarantee you could keep your doctor or plan. no plan
needed before it can be executed or implemented? you, you cut and in like 18,000 separate law enforcement agencies in the united states. i'm not knowledgeable of how those categories are handled by independent law enforcement entities, what it takes to have those categories added and the information and put in each of these law enforcement jurisdictions. i would have to get back to you. >> i appreciate that. i think the communities -- the communities also would. in terms of training, we have had this discussion about fbi staff training. the train was utilizing stereotypic erroneous information. we brought that to you, and you're telling us, you're looking at, making sure that these things would be eliminated and addressed. since then, i have heard a couple more times that certain regions have been doing that again. i would like an update on that train. in this area. tomade changes to that end my understanding, those changes have been adopted. training meets the appropriate standards. if you have instances that you have heard that is not accurate, i would appreciate knowing it but i have n
%. an rights activists filing a lawsuit in an effor to stop the new gun-control law. considered the toughest in the country. their lawsuit filed by the national rifle association affiliate in n york argues a law violates the second amendment in this respect new yorkers because it was passed without committee hearings or public hearing. meanwhile, the independence institute has filed lawsuits challenging colorado's new anti-gun laws. those laws barely a one day old. the nra issued a statement supporting the carter lawsuit and is considering joining in a legal challenge. a house representatives said they avoided the governmt shut down by approving a $984 billion spending bill to fund the government through september. my next guest voted against the bill. joining us is congressman martin sussman of indiana, member of the house financial services committee, chairman of the second amendment initiative. good to have you with us. let's start with why you voted against the continuing resolution. >> great to be with you. you know, as the house and senate have been working through the continuing resol
voted against the key provision in the the president's law feeling politically anxious about it. >> you will remember the white house's rational for the medical device tax was it would help the companies because with obamacare, it would increase hospital demand for these devices, there by increasing these company's profits and this was a way for them to give back a little bit. is that argument no longer valid? >> well, it's certainly in doubt as the implementation of the law falls further into debt. that was the same argument that the president made when he did the deal. he cut a deal with health insurance providers that said, look, you're going to give something up front as your profits go down a bit, but we're going to force with the mandate, compel people by law to buy your product so you're going to make so much in the long run you shouldn't kick up too much fuss and got a deal with them. the problem with the medical device people, they're not nearly as big an industry as the health insurance industry. they can't necessarily afford to take the kind of hit. at 3, almost 4% tax, i thi
to properly implement the laws that we have in place to protect the rights of the people involved. we have, as we noted, a bubble ordinance that has been imposed for quite sometime, and we enacted as a board last year a white zone ordinance which we offer to provide additional protections. unfortunately the laws that we've had in place have not been sufficient to protect the women, especially here. demonstrators continue to not only harass and intimidate, but they try to find loopholes in the existing laws. and what we have right now is a last resort attempt to provide some protection to the patients who want to access this clinic and to the men and women who work there. the ordinance that we have -- we are introducing creates a buffer zone, that it provides protection of 25 radius within the entrance of the clinic. it amends the bubble ordinance that was passed by this board in 1993. that bubble ordinance was a good start, but this is needed. let me say that what we are doing is something that we don't do lightly. we recognize the right of people to express free expression, to express the
national academy of elder law attorneys, local northern california chapter. i would bring new blood and new ideas, even though i'm in an old body and i would be very happy to work with [speaker not understood] people. i understand there is some interest in having a woman and a lawyer. i am both. thank you. >> thank you. any questions? seeing none, thank you very much. next person is james illig. i-l-l-i-g. i'm sorry, thank you. next person is james wagoner. >>> good afternoon. i'm a recent law school graduate. i graduated from jfk university school of law last year. and currently i'm honored to be the boardshire fellow in law and aging at bay area legal aid where i started the project for glbt senior advocacy in september and the project is basically concerned with providing legal representation and advice concerning public benefits for lgbt seniors. the project is trying to ensure that lgbt seniors do not -- low-income lgbt seniors do not disappear from our community if something goes wrong with their benefits. and so far we've had some successes and we had some challenges. but the
at the supreme court. >> it's being asked to decide there whether or not congress can pass a law that treats same-sex couples who are already married under the laws of their state different from opposite section sex couples. >> reporter: defenders of the law say congress has as much right as the states to make its own definition of marriage. >> doma is important because congress said it was important. i mean we sent our elected representatives to washington, d.c. and they chose to say that marriage is one man and one woman for purposes of federal law. >> reporter: conservatives say the founding fathers never contemplated gay marriage. >> because it's clearly not what anyone understood as marriage at the time of the framing of the constitution. >> reporter: still, same-sex families pay taxes and don't get the same benefits and the issue with doma really gets complicated if they have children who are also excluded from benefits. >> when we have kids i would like them to be born in a post-doma united states. >> still, california is one of only a handful of states that gives most of the benefits of m
-sex marriageings. both laws aim to block same-sex marriage becoming legal. a decision isn't expected until sometime in june. today a palace memorial will be held for tom clemens head of the colorado prison system. you remember this he was shot dead in his home last week. he was a troubled son of a good friend of the colorado governor. he died in a shootout in the state of texas. heather? >> well postal workers across the country have a message. they want to continue saturday mail delivery. it is mandated law but the loss is threatening to cut it to save money. karen gray of houston stopped rallies in virginia in maryland. they protested the same saturday service. >> the possibility of an end to saturday delivery looms large. the general wants to stop saturday mail delivery starting with office. the national association of letter carriers said a loud collective. >> this is part of a pre-meditated rumor designed to stop the postal service. >> union leaders more of the same. >> deliver on rday. >> they agree more are paying bills on-line but not everybody like seniors those who live in rural areas and
-span2, the fbi's top lawyer on how law-enforcement investigations are keeping up with new technology without breaking the law. that's followed by a house appropriations subcommittee looking into agriculture department spending. then "the communicators" with commissioner robert mcdowell. >> the nation's highest court is holding oral arguments this week on to gay marriage cases. the first people got in line thursday, and now the going rate for saving a seat is around $6000. a couple weeks ago director rob reiner explained why this is drawing such interest. here's a portion of what he had to say. >> one of the reasons we took on proposition eight, aside from the obvious reasons of marriage equality and we should all be treated as equal under the law and its, it was a bad initiative, and you know, the courts of our it overturned. we hope the supreme court will uphold those. those rulings. but it was partly an education process. we discover as we go along that, first of all, there's not one person in this audience, or anywhere, that doesn't have a gay person in the family or gay friend or
to have an end poi. >> if we have more certainty, with regard to our tax laws, and recession -- regulatory policy, and demonstrate that we understand we have to get our debt down, it has to be enforceable, you have to change who is eligible for, what at what age, and what subsidy. neil: i love about dave, he ticks off people on the right and the left, this is a mutually destructive type issue for the right and left. >> assured destruction. neil: thank you. very much david walker. all right if we get in, is it time to get out, what is washington goes 3 with a plan to ramp up spending. some very worried market pros, saying this is a recipe for selling. monica, i think markets have been under the assumption that some cuts are better than no cuts, sequestration is better than nothing, so, if you just pullback, and say we're not going to to squat, in fact we'll do more, spend more that could derail a bill market faster than anything, right? >> it can, derail a bull market, but i think this problem is that washington is behaving like a lot of financial institutions that got themselves and the cu
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